By Lapping Waves: An Andaree

Hold my hand by the water of lapping waves

Take me to the cave of love that saves

And thrill me within my heart

But whole, not in part

So charming

Kiss

No harming

While you work your art

And shoot me thru with your dart

Before we lie prostrate in cold graves

Hold my hand by the water of lapping waves


Note: The Andaree was created by Andrea Dietrich and is syllabic, with lines of 11/9/7/5/3/1/3/5/7/9/11
Rhyme Scheme: A a b b c b c b b a A
It requires a Refrain: Line 1 is repeated as Line 11.
Generally displayed centered

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Waistband

Excitation from inhalation of your cream sweet aroma

And suddenly this dream breaks the banality of reality

In the finality of passion to allure me to secure me to you

In full view of this world into which I am now bound

To the sound of your love and laughter forever hereafter

As you press my head to your waist where I am graced

To taste your infection of life affection without rejection

As now beneath your lifegiving hand I am your waistband

And I thank you . . .

Feet: A Tanaga

Will you come to me today?
Will you teach me how to play?
Can we dance in glowing rain?
Will you take away my pain?

Will you bring me to my knees?
Will you do just as you please?
Can we ride the flashing seas?
Will you heal my deep disease?

Will you save me from this heat?
Will you lift me to the sky?
Can you teach me how to fly?
Will you let me kiss your feet?


Note: The Tanaga is a Filipino stanzaic form that was originally written in Tagalog. The form dates back to the 16th century and has an oral tradition. The poems are (usually) not titled. Each is emotionally charged and asks a question that begs an answer. The Tanaga is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
  • syllabic, 7-7-7-7 syllables per line.
  • rhymed, originally aaaa bbbb cccc etc., modern Tanagas also use aabb ccdd, etc., or abba cddc, etc., or any combination rhyme can be used.
  • composed with the liberal use of metaphor.

Lap of Luxury

Blow through my soul to rekindle an unquenchable fire

That burns higher than the flames of shame and blame

Because I belong to you in a sweet surrender so tender

Which the very angels long to remember in the heavens

Leavened with grace and love from above that descends

Into your tender heart in which I take my forever-part

As I lay my weary head to bed in your valley to be fed

So graciously by your tree of life to be so young and free

You Found Me, Bound Me

Held in captivity by the creativity of your love

In utter passivity as you wrap your arms around me

And hold me spellbound by the sound of your beating heart

For the better part of the night with delight from the stars above

With love untold in this world from heaven’s trove in the grove of gods

And you sing to me such a sweet melody incredibly pleasant

For such a peasant as I have been till finding you

And binding myself to your smooth chest

Like amulet freely worn now to adorn

Magic Burning: A Marianne Poem

Always learning

Running free with the wind

To be possessed by your burning

Laced with magic

Churning

 


Note: The Marianne is a verse form that is written with a combination rhyme and syllable count. It was created by Viola Berg . The lines should be centered on the page. The Marianne is:

  • a poem in 5 lines
  • syllabic, 4/6/8/4/2 syllables per line
  • rhymed, a x a x a, with x being unrhymed

Place Love Above All: An Abhanga

Placing love above all
In the heart of a child
So very free and wild
To kiss sweet cheek

New song sung for the young
Who’ve just begun to dance
With cosmic happenstance
On world’s bright stage

Now comes the vision free
Of brighter tomorrow
With what God will bestow
In liberty

 


Note: The abhanga, an Indian form of poetry, means “the completion” and is a stanzaic form commonly used for devotional poetic composition although it has also been used for cynicism, satire and reflective moods. It was popular from the 13th thru 17th centuries Marathi Region of India and is described as complex and classic.
The Abhanga is:
  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains (4 line stanzas).
  • syllabic, 6/6/6/4 syllables each
  • L2 and L3 rhyme. Often internal rhyme is employed. End rhyme scheme x a a x , x being unrhymed.