Maftet: Lessons Along the Nile, Part III

Blow upon blow; slow and determined; violent show of hateful force, vile and wild. Blood like a volcano erupting, disrupting the soil so pure; the spoil of vengeance. Two men. Brother and brother; one murdering the other. Cries of agony finally ceased for the one deceased. Body laid still of the one who paid the price, who made right sacrifice. True?

“Kaini ndi Abele,” Maftet spoke, “but Dyēus never wanted flood of blood; Abele misunderstood but gave in generosity with no animosity. He sought to please, not seize, and on bended knees made oblation on every opportune occasion. So did Dyēus accept as libation what was spilled on crude altar with the song-psalter of pleasant Abele. Kaini was always cruel, an human ghoul born of Adama and Havva, after sinister sister.” She nodded toward the hill in the distance, behind the spill of life, to haunting-beautiful face filled with thrill at the sight of such morbid might at the hand under her command. Such was her desire, soul sunken in mire of evil. “Lilith.” And with the very name spoken my spirit was broken.

Kali_Yantra[2]“No need to be afraid,” said Maftet. “You’re only seeing, not seen; this has all gone, though come again in cycle of sin. But look! Lilith turns to leave Kaini to burn in his rage as the body of brother slain has lain on the plain but one moment, blood still hot, no rot begun. Ah! the witch-bitch of Şeytan will now move east to feast on kindred beast, where she will be high priest of newly birthed city of Smriti. There from the tomb of her womb oozed Kālikā, the warrior goddess severing heads and leading the dead, who cast dæmonic spell upon Bast, who then fast held to blood lust to suck from male bust the thick, red wine inmixed with noxious brine.”

At the terrible look of Kaini my body shook, and I took Maftet by hand to steady my stand. “So from Şeytan and Lilith came Kālikā, and from Kālikā came Bast?”

“No! You still have ears that do not hear! I’ll emasculate you to immaculate your mind so blind, I swear; to give you wisdom instead of prison of rancidity of stupidity!” Again deep inhalation. Eyes closed. Slow exhalation. “I said Kālikā cast spell upon Bast — terrible spell from hell — but Kālikā actually gave birth far more than her worth. But this was the revenge of God. You see, father sent Tanrı-meleği to Kālikā, and Tanrı paid the price and laid with vice, so Kālikā bore Parvati, who entered the world carnally, but with such verdancy and vibrancy that Tanrı quickly ensconced her away further east to stay, and there lay her upon Mount Kailash, where celestial arms would guard her against all devilish harms.” 

“All seems so torn and forlorn, so stark and dark in this world,” sadly I said.

“Not so,” Maftet smiled. “Even the wicked can change when given free range of choice and sight of true light… Kālikā was evil, but now far more civil; still dangerous, yet she can be curiously gracious, even aurous in her hospitality. Only beware of her fare, as her board spread with feast may come from the beast; but at least she’s now as apt to kill with wondrous skill the wicked as once she was the ambivalent and innocent.”

“What happened, then, to Parvati? Was she protected by the Almighty?”

parvati-pink300[1]“Yes, of course,” Maftet chuckled. “Still I have to keep you buckled, don’t I? You spy so little in so much told, but you’re young not old. Yes, Parvati lived and thrived, and still lives and thrives, and round the world has many hives of charity without disparity, of love unbounded and founded on truth from above, of divine courage that impregnates every grand story with glory. Yes, Parvati lives and gives life even to the barren in fields of famine that amaze even the Brahman! This is why the three-maters, especially Sélená, love her so much, like precious dove, heavenly clove.”

“And Şeytan and Lilith?” Not blatant, I asked my latent question.

“The Sun of Dawn rose like celestial swan with healing in his wings, what brings deliverance from disease, as he snatched the keys of dark abyss so remiss of life, place of dearth and death beyond this earth; and his breeze blows so softly through myriad trees. Yes, my love, this One struck near-fatal blow to Crow of hell and fiendish flow of flies of lies; and God was thus pleased and appeased… But enough for now; your heart will no more allow, and how can I tell you more without opening another door?”

So Maftet led me back to the Nile shore and once more into the depths, and I wondered again what might next be in store?

.

Tanrı-meleği — Lit. Turkish for “angel of God,” here used as proper name

Kālikā — Otherwise “Kali,” goddess of fierce empowerment; of time, change, power, creation, preservation and destruction; obviously, recast within this narrative

Parvati — Goddess of love, fertility and devotion; of divine strength and power; gentle and nurturing

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Note: Image of Parvati from www.yrinak.blogspot.com

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