Maftet: Lessons Along the Nile

hecate-triple-goddess-of-justice2“Dyēus alone plumed from his womb three daughters without mater,” Maftet slowly blinked, smiled and winked. “There names are Sélená and Cybele and Kheba, treble sisters terrible in power, but kindly enough to those who properly cower.” She looked reminiscing at the water, remembering the deadly slaughter of arrogant men full of prideful sin, and the escape of slaves to take new shape as more than sheep, to their own kingdom-keep.

“And they loved each other, and so others were born to adorn earth and sky, and leaven heaven with music bright and fair, through light and night, and never to care; they breathed pure air as they offered prayer to the three maters, daughters of Dyēus,” she shook her hair freely with look of radiance, and her fragrance intoxicating weakened me to fall into open arms to keep me from harm; so strong where I belong… I always had, and no more sad. She laughed.

“Ma’at was ne’er born, really, but torn forlorn from father’s heart to play her part as defender of truth, lender of wisdom, mender of foul schism warped through prism of Amheh, putrid hiss of the bottomless Abyss.” Her face glistened, eyes christened with crystal as I listened. “And so she it is who like great eagle high flies through the world of humanity, to look upon their insanity and puffed up vanity. And do you wonder why she tries to silence the lies and wicked cries of Şeytan flowing out from dæmonic Forest of Platan? You see what you’ve become as the children of God succumb to vile ddiafol, and march to drum of the scum!”

Crocodile in the Nile. Standard bearer of terror. Maftet laughed again as I began to shake and quake. “Have no fear, my dear; that’s only Sobki looking for his dinner, but he usually eats only the sinner.” More laughter. With wave of hand, she told him to behave and crave no meal here, nor try to steal her prized possession, which I surmised was me, which every open eye could see! I said nothing, though blushing at her stunning claim… It was true, though, and I knew.

“You see, my lovely little bumble-bee, when humanity was just begun you were one, and all was gay and fun; no foul play and nothing to shun, except the cunning Şeytan.”

The guile of the Nile was sweet, mystical ambrosia to my spirit. I replied in far-off, soft tone. “Yes … united in harmony, not blighted by blood and love in flood of peace…”

“More than this,” Maftet said as she led me down into the stream of numinous dream-cream with intoxicating steam rising into my nostrils and I so docile. “Before Havva and Adama there were the Binabae-Аралас, reflections of perfection, before Şeytan divided one and guided the now two differentiated and inebriated into drunken conflict that would afflict humanity from that day forth, and convict in sin that grew and festered, accrued and sequestered one from another — sister from brother, father from mother. And with murderous-skilled hands they killed the Binabae-Аралас; though few remain, tis true.”

“I don’t understand.”

Maftet turned on me fierce and pierced me with her eyes. “Dull-wit! Sit!” In the water? “Yes! I should strip you and beat you, whip you and treat you to Sobki! Have you been listening to what I’ve said, or is your head so thick as a brick! Little man, I’ll take a rattan to your naked ass for being so crass!” Her chest heaved as she deeply breathed; let go the phage of her rage. “Oh, but how would you know, and so slow to learn when you burn in your loins that adjoin to mind so blind? This is what happened when Havva was torn from Adama. Ah! But the ddiafol could not control the souls…” Maftet ran fingers through my hair to repair feelings peeling away in fright by sight of angry goddess. “But you have such a tender gender; don’t you see? Haven’t you always known deep down, to marrow and bone?”

Without being told, I made bold to touch strong, soft arm even risking harm … but Maftet gave no reason for alarm. “And so ever since that fateful day we’ve been trying to make our way to bring back together what was cut asunder?”

trinity[1]“Yes and no, which is why I’ve told you of Ma’at so bold; you’ve been sold the lie that adherence must be made to outward appearance lest incoherence cause an attrition of tradition holy and righteous, priceless in rightness. And all of this in plain sight of the blight of oppression and repression, degradation and humiliation, aggression and aberration. Tell me, my little pea, can two of the same love one another without any blame? It is the soul of another that fills the hole in one’s own dearest spirit. And why not? This is the mimic of the timeless limerick of Sélená and Cybele and Kheba, what first burst forth from the bowels of father Dyēus… Remember, I said he alone plumed from his womb three daughters without mater.”

“And so what of me, now that you’ve snatched me from Bubastis and hatched such truth in the bed of my head; what now as before you I bow?” More laughter after stroking my cheek so sleek with dewdrops from eyes unwise. Would she now baptize me in the Nile beneath her radiant smile? Drum beat of my heart left me numb and dumb, with her thumb pressed at base of my neck; what would I now become?

“Wait, my dove; I’ve claimed you, not blamed you.” With arm round waist, she made no haste to led me deep into the keep of the ancient Nile, and as she lead said, “Come; there is more to show, for you to know; truth kept below by the foe of humanity driven to insanity. Come…”

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Dyēus — Sky father, or shining father; believed to be the chief deity in henotheistic Indo-European societies

Şeytan — Satan; devil

Ddiafol — Devil

Maftet — Deification of legal justice; consort of Ma’at

Ma’at — Deified concept of truth, balance, order, law, morality, and justice

Sélená and Cybele and Kheba — Three great ancient goddesses here recast as intimate sister-companions and daughters of Dyēus

Binabae-Аралас — Two combined words used to cast an ancient, pre-historic race of homo hermaphroditus (intersexual)

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Note: Image of triple-goddess from http://www.pinterest.com

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